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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

values

The centrality of religion in one's life is measured in this scale with six, seven-point Likert-type statements. The items are not specific to any religion or denomination nor do they stress any particular behaviors, e.g., attending church.  Given this, the scale appears to be useful to a wide variety of contexts in which the goal is to understand the role of religion in a person's life.

Four, nine-point statements are used to measure a person's view of what other people he/she is familiar with think about recycling. The scale is amenable for specifying the type of people being described, e.g., students.

Five, nine-point statements are used to assess the value placed by a person on an attainment of social status as well as control over other people and resources.

The scale assesses the degree to which a person believes that the number and quality of a person's possessions are necessary to achieve happiness in life. The original version of the scale was composed of five, five-point Likert-type statements. Alternative versions of the scale, varying in their length, were subsequently developed and tested by Richins (2004).

The degree to which a person believes that the number and quality of a person's possessions are indicators of success in life is measured using five point Likert-type statements. Alternative versions of the scale, varying in their length, have been developed and tested.

The scale is composed of Likert-type statements intended to capture the emphasis a person places on material things and the belief that those things bring happiness.

Twenty, seven-point Likert-type statements measure the degree to which a person expresses tendencies to control others through aggressive, manipulative, and even devious means in order to achieve personal or organizational objectives. In marketing research, the scale has mostly been used with marketing professionals in the U.S. (e.g., Ho et al. 1997; Hunt and Chonko 1984). See Wirtz and Kum (2004) for a use of the scale with a mixture of Singaporean workers, professionals, and ultimate consumers.

The scale is intended to measure the extent to which a person believes that buying and owning things are important in his/her life.  The original version of the scale has seven, five-point Likert-type items.  Alternative versions of the scale, varying in their length, have been developed and tested as well.

Thirteen, seven point Likert-type statements are used to measure the extent to which a person expresses beliefs that are consistent with honest behavior. The scale as a whole is not specific to any particular object or time but appears to describe one's general behavior. Wirtz and Kum (2004) referred to the scale as morality.

The seven-item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures the value a person places on having a family and spending time with them.