You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

variety

Three questions with a seven-point response format are used to measure how much difference a person believes there to be in the activities he/she has engaged in during a specific time period.

Three, five-point Likert-type items compose the scale and are used to measure the degree to which a person believes the assortment of products available at a particular website is adequate for what he/she is interested in buying.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s enjoyment of trying unfamiliar experiences. Although three of the statements are general and do not indicate what is being experienced, two items mention products.

The likeability of the product options within a specified product category at a store’s website is measured using three, nine-point items.

Three statements are used to measure a person’s opinion of the degree of complexity in an assortment of some object due to the number of options available.

Three, nine-point items are used to measure a person’s judgement of the degree of variation there is among the options in an assortment of some object.

Six, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person’s desire to experience consistency and stability at the current time rather than change.

The scale uses three, seven-point items to measure a person's belief that a particular company gathers new product ideas from a group of people who are dissimilar in various ways and generate ideas that are diverse as well.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point items that measure the importance a shopper places on the breadth of a web store's offerings and that it has the newest products and known brands.

The scale uses five, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a consumer shops online because of the assortment of products available for purchase as well as the information about them compared to shopping in retail stores.