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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

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The degree to which a person believes the information presented or described in an advertisement could actually happen in real life is measured with three items.

Five Likert-type statements measure the relative degree to which a person focuses on programs when watching television or, instead, pays attention to something else.

Six, seven-point Likert-type statements measure the relative level of television programming a person admits to viewing on a general basis.

The scale is composed of seven, five-point Likert-type items intended to measure the extent to which a person believes that parents should control what their children watch on television. In the studies by Walsh, Laczniak, and Carlson (1998; Carlson, Laczniak, and Walsh 2001) the scale was responded to by mothers but it appears to be amenable for use with other types of respondents as well.

The scale is composed of five, five-point Likert-type items intended to measure the extent to which a person believes that there is a need for an organization, independent of parties involved in marketing products, to control television programming aimed at children. As one of the items indicates, the independent organization is envisioned as being composed of parents, educators, and broadcasters; government is not specifically mentioned.  A separate scale was developed by Walsh, Laczniak, and Carlson (1998) for that.

The scale is composed of nine, five-point Likert-type items intended to measure the extent to which a person believes that television broadcasters should be proactive in controlling the programming, including commercials, that are aimed at children.

The scale is composed of thirteen, five-point items measuring the frequency with which a person reports watching specific types of programs on television.

The extent to which a person believes that there is a need for government regulation of programming (including commercials) aimed at children is measured by nine, five-point Likert-type items.

The scale is composed of four, five-point Likert-type statements measuring the extent to which a consumer reports consulting advertisements before making purchase decisions in order to make "better" decisions.

The scale is composed of four, five-point items that measure the frequency with which a person watches television in order to hear the local, national, and international news.