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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

visual

Six, nine-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person is easily able to imagine how furniture would look in a dwelling (house or apartment).

Four, nine-point uni-polar items measure how much a color or an object’s color is bright and vibrant.

Using eight, nine-point items, the scale measures the degree to which a person wants greater physical intimacy with a particular person, e.g., to touch, smell, see, hear.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how much a person believes that a particular object looks complex.   

Three, seven-point Likert items are used to measure how visually attractive and appealing a product’s design is considered to be.

A person’s general attitude about a logo is measured with three, five-point semantic differentials.

With three, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes a particular website has a visually pleasing design.

The degree to which a person reports being able to “see” in his/her mind a particular object or action is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

With three, seven-point items, the scale measures a person’s tendency to notice and attend to sounds, smells, and visual aspects of his/her nearby surroundings.

The scale has ten items that measure a person’s desire to eat in response to “external” stimuli (non-hunger related), with an emphasis on exposure to the sights and smells of food.