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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

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The scale has four, five-point items that measure how much a person experiences a loss of time consciousness and awareness of his/her physical surroundings when at a particular website.

This scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree of control a person reports having over his/her interaction with a particular website. The scale was referred to as the control subfactor of a second-order construct that Wang et al. (2007) called flow. While this factor and the others measured by Wang et al. (2007) might as a set be viewed as composing flow, they do not individually appear to measure flow, thus, are not referred to here as such.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person says that browsing a website stimulated his/her curiosity. The scale was referred to as the curiosity subfactor of a second-order construct that Wang et al. (2007) called flow. While this factor and the others measured by Wang et al. (2007) might be viewed as a set as composing flow, they do not individually appear to measure flow.  Given this, they are not called flow here.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how interesting and enjoyable it is to browse a website. The scale was referred to as the interest subfactor of a second-order construct that Wang et al. (2007) called flow. While this factor and the others measured by Wang et al. (2007) might be viewed together as composing flow, they do not by themselves (independently) appear to measure flow.  Given this, the scales are not individually referred to in the database as measures of flow.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person says that his/her mind was focused on the task of browsing a website rather than on something else. The scale was referred to as the attention subfactor of a second-order construct that Wang et al. (2007) called flow. While this factor and the others measured by Wang et al. (2007) might as a set be viewed as composing flow, they do not individually appear to measure flow, thus, are not referred to it here by that term.