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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

win

This eight-item scale measures one’s need to perform better than others and the desire to win in interpersonal situations.

Four statements are used to measure the attitude one holds about luck such that it plays an important role in life and favors some people while not others.

The fierceness of the rivalry between bidders in an auction is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert items that measure how much a person expected to feel good if he/she scored many points in a game.

How much a person believes the nature of a specific reward is not only acceptable but motivates him/her to accomplish something is measured with three, seven-point uni-polar items.

This three item, eleven-point Likert-type is intended to measure how stimulated and competitive a person felt when bidding against other people in a particular auction.

Three, eleven point Likert-type items are used to measure the importance a person placed on winning a particular auction he/she was involved in with other bidders.

The scale measures a person’s eagerness for his/her group to compete against other such groups and win.  The way the groups would compete and how superiority would be judged are not explicitly identified in the items and can be specified in the questionnaire.  Six, seven-point items compose the scale.

The three-item, five-point scale measures the degree to which a person describes him/herself as being competitive and as having a strong desire to win.

These ten, five-point Likert-type items are intended to measure the degree of value a consumer places on the offer extended to him/her by a former service provider in an effort to reacquire his/her business after having defected. The scale was called win-back offer worth (WOW) by Tokman, Davis, and Lemon (2007).