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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

work

The scale has twelve, six-point Likert-type items that measure a person’s chronic motivation to make progress towards achieving a goal in a direct manner without deviation and distraction.

This scale is composed of three, seven-point items that measure how much a person believes another person is busy at work rather than spending time in leisure activities.

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a person believes that people can achieve success over time if they work hard.

The scale measures the degree to which a person views a particular activity as being like a chore and requiring effort to do.  Two- and three-item versions have been tested as have versions with slightly different items.

A person's preparation for and eagerness to begin a certain task is measured in this scale with three, nine-point Likert-type items.

This four-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used in measuring the degree to which a person reports enjoyment of work in general and staying busy. This is not necessarily an indication of involvement or interest in a specific job.

This is a three-item, seven-point scale measuring the relative amount of time a person spends on achieving a healthy balance between stress and work on the one hand and rest and relaxation on the other.

The scale uses five, five-point statements to measure the perceived probability that a person will advance through the stages of a job application process from contacting the company to accepting the position if it is offered.

Four, five-point items are used to measure a person's attitude toward working for a particular company and the likelihood of seeking employment with it in the future.

Six, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the value a person places on work in his/her life.